What to take on a motorcycle journey

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Dateline: 13 June 2011

What to take on a long distance motorcycle journey.
When I plan my journeys I spend a lot of time on Google maps. Finally I print maybe one or two views which show a route of 5,000 to 8,000 miles. Good overview, not much detail.
Google maps are fantastic tools: unfortunately they require web access and  the internet is not always available or free when you’re out in the boonies.
So to supplement Google maps  it’s likely that 20% of the space and weight in my bags is taken up by electronics.
There’s a laptop - essential for up to the moment reports on the road, the laptop charging kit - also comprising an inverter to convert DC (motorcycle battery) power to AC - and several different cables for phones and cameras to be charged whilst moving,  (Sat Navs eat power). 
Last year I experienced a lot of pain when using ear bud headsets connected directly to the phone – using the buds up to 14 hours a day I should have expected it; so the Bluetooth helmet upgrade is designed to obviate the ear buds and take care of GPS and sound.
Thus even my helmet needs charging kit as the Bluetooth GPS system uses the headphones built in to the helmet itself.
So what works?
Well, over 50mph I cannot hear opera. Over 70mph I cannot hear rock n’roll. This setup gives me automatic speed data.
GPS? My Ndrive system sulks in silence most of the time because I refuse to follow absurd instructions.
My advice on what to pack? A map.
And one of these for making coffee http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm

When I plan my journeys I spend a lot of time on Google maps. Finally I print maybe one or two views which show a route of 5,000 to 8,000 miles. Good overview, not much detail.

Google maps are fantastic tools: unfortunately they require web access and  the internet is not always available or free when you’re out in the boonies.

So to supplement Google maps  it’s likely that 20% of the space and weight in my bags is taken up by electronics.

There’s a laptop - essential for up to the moment reports on the road, the laptop charging kit - also comprising an inverter to convert DC (motorcycle battery) power to AC - and several different cables for phones and cameras to be charged whilst moving,  (Sat Navs eat power). 

Last year I experienced a lot of pain when using ear bud headsets connected directly to the phone – using the buds up to 14 hours a day I should have expected it; so the Bluetooth helmet upgrade is designed to obviate the ear buds and take care of GPS and sound.

Thus even my helmet needs charging kit as the Bluetooth GPS system uses the headphones built in to the helmet itself.

So what works?Aeropress - french press coffee for campers

Well, over 50mph I cannot hear opera. Over 70mph I cannot hear rock n’roll. This setup gives me automatic speed data.

GPS? My Ndrive system sulks in silence most of the time because I refuse to follow absurd instructions.

My advice on what to pack? A map.

And one of these. Fantastic coffee maker from Aeropress,






Comments

  • That should be Bodum. They also do an excellent travel press which doubles as a mug saving having to carry a cup

    Posted by Tom Halpin , 12/12/2011 7:32am (6 years ago)

  • Budum make a much smaller and neater one cup coffee maker but it's drip rather than pressure. But if space is an issue....
    My iPad has 99% replaced my laptop and is much smaller and lighter as is the charger whitch can be used for iPhone and iPod

    Posted by Tom Halpin , 12/12/2011 7:28am (6 years ago)

  • I also find that earbuds for my ipod etc not very comfortable after a few hours. The bluetooth helmet sounds like the right option!

    Posted by Michael Boken, 13/06/2011 6:11pm (6 years ago)

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